Skip to main content

Featured

Ground Breaking

Reuse, recycle, reduce. We hear these ideas all the time and I tend to think they are good ones. It comes in especially great when someone gives me an old kiln.  That is exactly what happened when the electric kiln that we used for cone 6 glaze firing gave up the ghost at Callanwolde. It’s a good size kiln, much bigger than my electric kiln but I’m not interested in rewiring this one. You may remember I did that with my electric kiln when I installed the kiln sitter (you can read about that here) which I got from another free kiln.

My plan for this kiln is to make it a reduction kiln since that is the look I like best for my pots. I am even considering adding a stoke hole so I can feed some small piece of wood into the kiln for some ash and wood effects.

Before I can start converting it into a gas kiln I need to build a kiln shed. My current kiln room is fine for the electric kiln but it’s too crowded to add flame to the mix. I’m designing a simple lean-to type shed that will have a m…

The Good and Bad of Wood Firing

We unloaded the wood kiln this past weekend.  Unloading any kiln has often been compared to Christmas.  You know how it is.  You feel joyful anticipation, you can't wait to see what's inside that package.  Sometimes it's that beautiful thing you've been hoping for and dreaming about, some times it's a fuzzy pink bunny suit.

When you open an anagama kiln you might get both and everything in between.  This firing was no exception.  Do you want the good news first or the bad news first?

I'll start with the bad, it's nice to end on a happy note.  We suspect this pile of broken pots was due to a problem with the clay causing cristobalite inversion.  Only the plié of broken pots you see here are all make with either Highwater Phoenix or Aurora which are very similar clay bodies.  We both had failures and success with this clay so it's hard to say with complete certainty.  Although I may be inclined to try some Laguna Bmix Wood for the next firing.

Cristobalite Inversion by Future Relics Gallery
Crack Pots

I did get a few nice pieces like this hanging candle ring.

Hanging pottery candle holder by Future Relics Pottery
Hanging Candle Ring

This kitchen crock came out looking pretty nice too, its got more coppery glaze on the other side but this side got photographed when it came out of the kiln.

Anagama Fired Utensile Holder by Lori Buff
Kitchen Crock




Check out the gallery page - Future Relics Gallery by Lori Buff

Comments

  1. oh so sorry for all that loss, what a bummer, but that candle ring and crock are definitely sweet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Linda, thankfully most of it is not mine and the guy who did loose most of those pots had a huge amount of pots and they were all beautiful so we are both okay about it.

      Delete
  2. Jeff and I have had some issues with highwater clays and wood firing. Laguna b-mix for wood is spectacular. Even regular b-mix in wood is gorgeous. Your pots got some really nice flashing, you must be very happy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good tip on Bmix Michèle. Bmix wood needs to be ordered from my local clay store, but they normally have regular Bmix in stock.
      I am very happy, I just lost a few mugs. No big deal.

      Delete
    2. I don't think I have ever participated in a wood firing where there wasn't some loss. You just hope for the best!

      Delete
    3. Isn't that the truth. Of course when they come out well they tend to come out really well so it's worth it.

      Delete
  3. What a shame. Sorry that happened.
    On the happy note, that candle hanger is majorly cool. The kitchen crock is amazing. I love those warm wood fire glazes. The pieces that made it though are fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Cindy, none of those pieces have any glaze on the outside, that's all the wood kiln working. This is why I love it and am willing to risk loosing a few pots.

      Delete
  4. the kitchen crock looks great, but OH NO, broken?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Gary, luckily the crock is fine, it's just a few mugs that got broken.

      Delete
  5. What in the world! I have fired a few wood kilns, but never seen that many broken pieces, ugh! I saw that kind of carnage in my own kiln when a shelf broke in two, it just sinks your heart. Fortunately you do build up a tolerance to kiln disasters! The candle ring is great though:-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never seen this type of breakage before either. Normally all I see are pots that fell over due to wading slipping or pots that got hit with wood. Many of these pots looked perfect when the kiln was cracked at about 300 degrees.
      Thanks.

      Delete
  6. we once did a wood fire where the only work that made it was 6 pieces that Mark put in. Everything else came out in pieces due to bad clay- we should have run to jobs right at that moment in time. Did we no- we were young.... it is a lesson of heart break.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh no!!! Now that was a disaster. This is nothing in comparison. The pottery world is a better place because you and Mark stuck with it through all kinds of heart break.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts