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Ground Breaking

Reuse, recycle, reduce. We hear these ideas all the time and I tend to think they are good ones. It comes in especially great when someone gives me an old kiln.  That is exactly what happened when the electric kiln that we used for cone 6 glaze firing gave up the ghost at Callanwolde. It’s a good size kiln, much bigger than my electric kiln but I’m not interested in rewiring this one. You may remember I did that with my electric kiln when I installed the kiln sitter (you can read about that here) which I got from another free kiln.

My plan for this kiln is to make it a reduction kiln since that is the look I like best for my pots. I am even considering adding a stoke hole so I can feed some small piece of wood into the kiln for some ash and wood effects.

Before I can start converting it into a gas kiln I need to build a kiln shed. My current kiln room is fine for the electric kiln but it’s too crowded to add flame to the mix. I’m designing a simple lean-to type shed that will have a metal roof and some sort of chimney. I’m considering a chimney cap or roof mounted exhaust turbine. My thought is that the turbine would do a great job of pulling the heat out from under the roof. My fear is that it’ll be too hot and wear out the turbine quickly. There is always so much to think about with these types of projects.

Right now I’ve just started to dig the post holes. Post hole digging is a lot of work but it’s only 4 posts so I should get it done and start setting the posts pretty soon.

Building a reduction kiln for Future Relics Pottery
Digging for Post Holes

Speaking of posts, check back here or on one of the listed social media sites to see the progress.



Check out the gallery page - Future Relics Gallery by Lori Buff

Comments

  1. There are a couple of potters here in Seagrove that get some great results from converted electric kilns. I also know a potter in NH that has turned a group of electric kilns into a wood kiln. You can check her out here: http://www.rootedinclay.com/

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the link, I saw that set up a few years ago and thought it was pretty smart. Mine is not going to be that large but I hope for similarly beautiful results.

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